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Pickerel SS-177 - History

Pickerel SS-177 - History


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Pickerel
(SS-177: dp. 1,330 (surf.), 1,997 (subm.); 1. 300'7"; b. 25'1";
dr. 13'10"; s. 19 k. (surf.), 9 k. (subm.); cpl. 50; a. 6 21"
tt., 1 3"; cl. Porpoise)

The first Pickerel (SS-177) was laid down 25 March 1935 by the Electric Boat Co., Groton, Conn.; launched 7 July 1936; sponsored by Miss Evelyn Standley, and commissioned 26 January 1937, Lt. L. J. Huffman in command.

After shakedown the new submarine conducted training exercises out of New London, Conn. until getting underway 26 October 1937 and headinK, via Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to transit thc Panama Canal 9 November. Joining the Pacific Fleet, Pickerel operated out of San Diego along the West Coast and in Hawaiian waters. Subsequently transferred to the Asiatie Fleet, she prepared for war with a vigorous training schedule in the Philippines.

Upon receiving word of Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, Pickerel sped to the coast of Indo-China and conducted her first war patrol off Cam Ranh Bay and Tourane Harbor. She tracked a Japanese submarine and a destroyer but lost them in haze and rain squalls before they came in torpedo range. On 19 December she also missed a small Japanese patrol craft with five torpedoes, before returning to Manila Bay on the 29th.

On her second patrol (31 December to 29 Jnnuary 1942) conducted between Manila and Surabaya the submarine sank the 2,929-ton ax-gunboat Kanko Maru ;0 Janunry 1942. On her third war patrol (7 Februnry to 19 March), along the
Malay Barrier and her fourth (15 April to 6 June) in the Philippines, she failed to score.

Pickerel'~ fifth war patrol (10 July-26 August) was a voyage from Brisbane, Austrnlia, to Pearl Harbor for refit, with a short patrol in the Marinnas enroute. She damaged a freighter on this run. On her sixth war patrol (22 January-3 March 1943) she searched among the Kuriles on the TokyoKiska traffic lanes. In sixteen attacks, she sank 1,990~ton Japanese cargo ship Tateynina Maru and two 35-ton sampans.

She departed Pearl Harbor 18 March 1943 and, after topping off with fuel at Midway 22 March, headed for the eastern coast of Northern Honshu and was never heard from again. Pickerel was the first submarine to be lost in the Central Pacific area. Post-war analysis of Japanese records credited Pickerel with sinking 440-ton Submarine Chaser No. 1~3 on 3 April and 1,113-ton cargo ship Fubuei Maru 7 April. Pickerel was struck from the Navy List 19 August 1943.

Pickerel received three battle stars for World War II service.


Pickerel SS-177 - History

USS Pickerel , a 1330-ton Perch class submarine built by the Electric Boat Company at Groton, Connecticut, was commissioned in January 1937. Following a shakedown cruise to the south Atlantic, she went to the Pacific in November of that year. Subsequently operating along the West Coast and in Hawaiian waters, in the fall of 1939 Pickerel voyaged west to join the Asiatic Fleet in the Philippines. She was based at Manila when war with Japan began in December 1941. Her first war patrol, off Camranh Bay on the Indochina coast, included several attacks, but no hits. Pickerel 's next patrol, to southward in the direction of the East Indies, cost the enemy the Kanko Maru , a gunboat converted from a freighter. Operating near Timor in February and March, the submarine attempted an attack on a light cruiser, but the effort only produced a depth charge counterattack.

Pickerel was based in Australia for her fourth and fifth patrols, during April-August 1942. Neither generated any notable damage to the Japanese. After receiving an overhaul at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, she was based at Pearl Harbor. Pickerel 's sixth World War II cruise, to the waters off northern Japan from late January to early March 1943, took a small freighter out of the enemy merchant fleet. Later in March she returned to that area for her seventh war patrol and, during the first week of April, appears from Japanese records to have sunk a submarine chaser and another small freighter. USS Pickerel was not heard from after that, and may have been the victim of enemy antisubmarine forces, though nothing certain is known about her fate. More than seventy officers and crewmen were lost with her.

This page features all the views we have concerning USS Pickerel (SS-177).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 65KB 740 x 530 pixels

Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 22 December 1942.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 54KB 740 x 585 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 22 December 1942.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 54KB 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

At the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 28 December 1942.
While outlines mark recent alterations to the ship, among them the addition of a pair of external bow torpedo tubes.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 80KB 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Plan view amidships and aft, taken at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 28 December 1942.
While outlines mark recent alterations to the ship, among them the relocation of the 3"/50 deck gun and addition of a radar antenna mast forward of the conning station.
Note the anti-torpedo net floats beyond the submarine.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 102KB 740 x 605 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Submarines in San Diego harbor, California, 1940

Moored alongside USS Holland (AS-3), from which the photograph was taken, the submarines are (from left to right): Salmon (SS-182) Seal (SS-183) Pickerel (SS-177) Plunger (SS-179) Snapper (SS-185) and Permit (SS-178).
Note the small motor boats, of the type carried by fleet submarines prior to World War II.
One of the men standing on Salmon 's deck is Yeoman Clayton Johnson, who in 1969 was a Commander serving at the Naval History Division.
USS Enterprise (CV-6) is in the distance, tied up at Naval Air Station, North Island.

Courtesy of the U.S. Naval Institute. James C. Fahey Collection.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 103KB 740 x 565 pixels

Todo Saki Lighthouse, Honshu Island, Japan

Periscope photograph taken by USS Pickerel (SS-177), probably during her sixth war patrol, circa February 1943.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 73KB 675 x 675 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Wooden pattern for the ship's brass data plaque, photographed by the Electric Boat Company, Groton, Connecticut, circa 1936 or early 1937.


Pickerel (i) (SS-177)


USS Pickerel as seen early in the war

USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. Augustus Howard Alston, Jr., USN) left Pearl Harbour for her seventh war patrol off the eastern coast of northern Honshu on 18 March 1943. Refuels at Midway on 22 March and was not heard from again. She was reported overdue on 12 May when she failed to return to Midway.

It is possible that she was lost on 3 April, 1943, off the Shiranuka Lighthouse, on the northern tip of Honshu by an attack by the Japanese minelayer Shirakami and the auxiliary subchaser Bunzan Maru.

Pickerel is also credited with sinking the Japanese submarine chaser Ch-13 (offsite link) south-east of Shiriysaki, Honshu in position 41º03'N, 141º58'E on 3 April 1943.

Commands listed for USS Pickerel (i) (177)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Lt. Leon Joseph Huffman, USN26 Jan 1937Apr 1939
2Barton Elijah Bacon, Jr., USNApr 1939Sep 1942
3T/Lt.Cdr. Augustus Howard Alston, Jr., USNSep 194212 May 1943 (+)

You can help improve our commands section
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Please use this if you spot mistakes or want to improve this ships page.

Notable events involving Pickerel (i) include:

8 Dec 1941
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. Barton Elijah Bacon, Jr) was ordered to patrol the coast of Indo-China off Cam Ranh Bay and Tourane Harbor.

29 Dec 1941
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. B.E. Bacon, Jr) ended her first war patrol at Manila.

31 Dec 1941
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. B.E. Bacon, Jr) left Manila for her second war patrol.

10 Jan 1942
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. B.E. Bacon, Jr) torpedoed and sank the Japanese auxiliary gunboat Kanko Maru (2929 GRT) at the mouth of Davao Gulf, off Cape San Augustin, Philippines in position 06°19'N, 125°54'E.

29 Jan 1942
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. B.E. Bacon, Jr) ended her second war patrol at Surabaya, Netherlands East Indies.

7 Feb 1942
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. B.E. Bacon, Jr) left Surabaya for her third war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off Malaya.

19 Mar 1942
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. B.E. Bacon, Jr) ended her third war patrol at Fremantle, Australia.

15 Apr 1942
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. B.E. Bacon, Jr) left Fremantle for her 4th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Philippines.

6 Jun 1942
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. B.E. Bacon, Jr) ended her 4th war patrol at Brisbane, Australia.

10 Jul 1942
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. B.E. Bacon, Jr) left Brisbane for her 5th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Mariana Islands area.

26 Aug 1942
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. B.E. Bacon, Jr) ended her 5th war patrol at Pearl Harbor. She was ordered to the Mare Island Navy Yard for a refit.

22 Jan 1943
With her refit completed USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. Augustus Howard Alston, Jr.) left Pearl Harbor for her 6th war patrol, and was ordered to patrol in Japanese home waters.

10 Feb 1943
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Alston, Jr) torpedoed and sank the Japanese merchant cargo Amari Maru (2184 GRT) off Sanriku in position 40°10'N, 142°04'E.

15 Feb 1943
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Alston, Jr) torpedoed and sank the Japanese transport ship Tateyama Maru (1990 GRT) off the east coast of Honshu in position 39°18'N, 142°08'E.

3 Mar 1943
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Alston, Jr) ended her 6th war patrol at Pearl Harbor.

18 Mar 1943
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Alston, Jr) departed from Pearl Harbor for her 7th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol of the eastern coast of Northern Honshu, Japan.

22 Mar 1943
USS Pickerel (Lt.Cdr. Augustus Howard Alston, Jr.) refuels at Midway, then departed from and was never heard from again.

Media links


U. S. Submarines in World War II
Kimmett, Larry and Regis, Margaret


Her keel was laid on 25 March 1935 by the Electric Boat Company in Groton, Connecticut. She was launched on 7 July 1936 sponsored by Miss Evelyn Standley, daughter of Rear Admiral William Standley, acting Secretary of the Navy. She was commissioned on 26 January 1937, Lieutenant Leon J. Huffman in command.

Inter-War Period

After her shakedown cruise, the new boat conducted training exercises out of New London, Connecticut until getting underway on 26 October 1937 and heading, via Guantánamo Bay, Cuba to transit the Panama Canal on 9 November. Joining the Pacific Fleet, Pickerel operated out of San Diego, California, along the West Coast, and in Hawaiian waters. Subsequently, transferred to the Asiatic Fleet, she prepared for war with a vigorous training schedule in the Philippines.

World War II

Upon receiving word of Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, Pickerel – commanded by Lieutenant Commander Barton E. Bacon, Jr. – sped to the coast of French Indochina and conducted her first war patrol off Cam Ranh Bay and Tourane Harbor. She tracked a Japanese submarine and a destroyer but lost them in haze and rain squalls before they came in torpedo range. On 19 December, she also missed a small Japanese patrol craft with five torpedoes, before returning to Manila Bay on 29 December.

On her second patrol—from 31 December 1941 – 29 January 1942 – conducted between Manila and Surabaya, the submarine sank Kanko Maru on 10 January 1942. On her third war patrol – from 7 February-19 March – along the Malay Barrier and her fourth – from 15 April-6 June – in the Philippines, she failed to score.

Pickerel ' s fifth war patrol, from 10 July to 26 August, was a voyage from Brisbane, Australia, to Pearl Harbor for refit, with a short patrol in the Mariana Islands en route, during which she damaged a freighter. During the refit, LCDR Bacon was detached and Pickerel ' s executive officer, Lieutenant Commander Augustus H. Alston, Jr., became her new CO.

On her sixth war patrol – from 22 January to 3 March 1943, she searched among the Kurile Islands on the Tokyo-Kiska traffic lanes. In sixteen attacks, she sank Tateyama Maru and two 35-ton sampans.

She departed Pearl Harbor on 18 March 1943 and, after topping off with fuel and provisions at Midway Island on 22 March, headed for the eastern coast of northern Honshū, Japan and was never heard from again. Pickerel was the first submarine to be lost in the Central Pacific area. She was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 19 August 1943.

Post-war analysis of Japanese records give conflicting suggestions about Pickerel ' s fate. The Japanese officially credit her with sinking Submarine Chaser Number 13 on 3 April and Fukuei Maru on 7 April, and give no official report of her destruction. Those records also describe an action off Shiramuka Lighthouse on northern Honshū on 3 April 1943 [11] in which naval aircraft first bombed an unidentified submarine, then directed Shiragami and Bunzan Maru to the spot, where they dropped twenty-six depth charges. A large quantity of oil floated to the surface, which was often enough for Japanese ASW ships to believe their target was sunk. It is likely Pickerel ' s fuel oil bunkers leaked. Since there were several other ASW operations in the area in that period, [12] and Pickerel was the only American submarine in that area one of these other attacks, sometime after 7 April, probably claimed her.


USS Pickerel (SS-177)

PICKEREL, commanded by Lt. Comdr. A. H. Alston, Jr., the first submarine to be lost in the Central Pacific area, set out from Pearl Harbor on 18 March 1943 and, after topping off with fuel at Midway on 22 March, began her seventh war patrol off the eastern coast of northern Honshu. She was never heard from after her departure from Midway.

She was ordered to remain in her area until sunset 1 May 1943 and then to return to Midway. Standing orders required her to transmit by radio prior to entering a circle of radius 500 miles from Midway, and this report was expected by 6 May. When it was not received, a message ordering an immediate reply was repeatedly sent. No answer was received, and plane search along her expected course revealed nothing. As a result, she was reported lost on 12 May 1943.

Anti-submarine attack data submitted by the Japanese at the end of the war list one attack which could conceivably have been on PICKEREL. This attack occurred on 3 April 1943, off Shiranuka Lighthouse, on the northern tip of Honshu. This position is outside the area assigned to PICKEREL, but no other submarine was in that area. FLYINGFISH was enroute to the area between Honshu and Hokkaido and arrived there on 6 April, but PICKEREL might well have moved into the northern area for a few days prior to FLYINGFISH's arrival if she found hunting poor in her own area. Indeed, unless the Japanese attacked a submarine which was the product of their own imaginations, they must certainly have attacked PICKEREL on 3 April, since no other of our boats was near the area of the attack.

However, a special notation is made on the Japanese records to the effect that they are inaccurate for the month of April 1943. Thus there is every reason to speculate that, if PICKEREL did survive the attack of 3 April, she may have been attacked later in her own area and the attack may not have been reported. We know that there were Japanese mine plants along the coast of Honshu, but a study of the track chart for PICKEREL's sixth war patrol, conducted in the same area, shows that the Commanding Officer was accustomed to stay outside the 60 fathom curve. Mines are normally ineffective in water that deep.

The probability as to the cause of PICKEREL's loss is that she was sunk by enemy depth charge attack. Operational casualties or mine explosions represent possibilities, but are not thought to be likely.

Google Earth image of possible location of the loss of USS Pickerel

During the six patrols before her final one, PICKEREL sank five ships totaling 16,100 tons, and damaged 10, totaling 9,100 tons. On her first patrol she did no damage to the enemy. Her second, conducted between Manila and Surabaya, resulted in the sinking of two freighters. PICKEREL's third patrol was conducted along the Malay Barrier and again no successful attacks were made. In her fourth patrol, in the Philippines, six attacks were made, but none resulted in damage to the enemy. PICKEREL's fifth patrol was a passage from Australia to Pearl Harbor for refit, with a short patrol in the Marianas enroute. She damaged a freighter on this run. On her sixth patrol this ship went to the Kuriles to patrol the Tokyo-Kiska traffic lanes. In sixteen attacks, she sank a freighter and two sampans, and did damage to another freighter and eight sampans.

Please note: Reports of the wartime discovery of the sunken vessel and the rescue of her crew are entirely ficticious.

USS Pickerel Crew in November 1937

See also Ed Howard's Final Patrol page on USS Pickerel (external link).

The Los Angeles Pasadena Base of the USSVI is the officially recognized custodian of the National Submarine Memorial, West.


World War II Database


ww2dbase Pickerel was a Porpoise-class submarine of the P-5/Perch sub-class. She held her shakedown cruise to the South Atlantic Ocean, operated on the East Coast of the United States, then on 26 Oct 1937 headed for the Pacific Ocean, arriving in San Diego, California, United States in Nov 1937 via the Panama Canal. In the fall of 1939, she sailed to the Philippine Islands to join the Asiatic Fleet. When the United States entered the war in Dec 1941, she was in Manila. Under the command of Lieutenant Commander Barton E. Bacon, Jr., she was immediately dispatched to Camranh Bay and Tourane Harbor off Indochina to hunt for Japanese shipping. She tracked a submarine and a destroyer but lost contact with them before she could attack, then on 19 Dec she attacked a small Japanese patrol craft with five torpedoes, but they all missed. The first patrol ended at Manila, Luzon, Philippines on 29 Dec. Her second war patrol lasted from 31 Dec 1941 to 29 Jan 1942, which brought her to waters between Manila and Surabaya, and she sank the 2,929-ton converted gunboat Kanko Maru on 10 Jan. Her third patrol lasted from 7 Feb to 19 Mar along the Malay Barrier and the fourth from 15 Apr to 6 Jun in the Philippine Islands both of them were uneventful. Her fifth war patrol originated from Brisbane, Australia and lasted from 10 Jul to 26 Aug, with the primary mission being reaching Pearl Harbor for eventual refitting at the Mare Island Navy Yard in California, United States, though she did patrolled briefly in the Mariana Islands en route and damaged a freighter. Her sixth war patrol lasted from 22 Jan to 3 Mar 1943 at the Kuril Islands in northern Japan, which saw the sinking of the 1,990-ton cargo ship Tateyama Maru and two sampans. On 22 Mar, she left Midway for her seventh war patrol, again to the northern Japanese waters. Communications was lost some time in early Apr 1943, and Pickerel was never heard from again. After the war, captured Japanese documents noted that Pickerel might have been attacked and damaged (as indicated by large oil leakage) by depth charges launched from aircraft and ships off Shiramuka Lighthouse in northern Honshu on 3 Apr 1943, then the submarine went on to sink the 440-ton Submarine Chaser Number 13 on 3 Apr and then the 1,113-ton cargo ship Fukuei Maru on 7 Apr. The Japanese reports most likely described the movements of Pickerel, since she was the only submarine operating in that area at the time. She was likely sunk shortly after 7 Apr by a similar attack that she experienced on 3 Apr.

ww2dbase Source: United States Navy Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, United States Navy Naval Historical Center.

Last Major Revision: Jul 2007

Submarine Pickerel (SS-177) Interactive Map

Pickerel Operational Timeline

26 Jan 1937 Pickerel was commissioned into service.
10 Jan 1942 USS Pickerel sank Japanese gunboat Kanko Maru off Davao Gulf, Mindanao, Philippine Islands.
3 Apr 1943 The US submarine Pickerel was depth charged and sunk by Japanese warships north of Honshu, Japan.

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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. 1st Sgt says:
25 Sep 2012 05:29:08 PM

Great information. Always been interested in WWII action. Naval, armies any thing with infromation of terrain, material, to really understand what all these men went thru.

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.


Service history [ edit | edit source ]

Inter-War Period [ edit | edit source ]

After her shakedown cruise, the new boat conducted training exercises out of New London, Connecticut until getting underway on 26 October 1937 and heading, via Guantánamo Bay, Cuba to transit the Panama Canal on 9 November. Joining the Pacific Fleet, Pickerel operated out of San Diego, California, along the West Coast, and in Hawaiian waters. Subsequently transferred to the Asiatic Fleet, she prepared for war with a vigorous training schedule in the Philippines.

World War II [ edit | edit source ]

Upon receiving word of Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, Pickerel - commanded by Lieutenant Commander Barton E. Bacon, Jr. - sped to the coast of French Indochina and conducted her first war patrol off Cam Ranh Bay and Tourane Harbor. She tracked a Japanese submarine and a destroyer but lost them in haze and rain squalls before they came in torpedo range. On 19 December, she also missed a small Japanese patrol craft with five torpedoes, before returning to Manila Bay on 29 December.

On her second patrol - from 31 December 1941 – 29 January 1942 - conducted between Manila and Surabaya, the submarine sank Kanko Maru on 10 January 1942. On her third war patrol - from 7 February-19 March - along the Malay Barrier and her fourth - from 15 April-6 June - in the Philippines, she failed to score (although she did make an unsuccessful torpedo attack on the unarmed Japanese hospital ship Takasago Maru on 26 April). ⎗] Pickerel ' s fifth war patrol, from 10 July to 26 August, was a voyage from Brisbane, Australia, to Pearl Harbor for refit, with a short patrol in the Mariana Islands en route, during which she damaged a freighter.

On her sixth war patrol - from 22 January to 3 March 1943, she searched among the Kurile Islands on the Tokyo-Kiska traffic lanes. In sixteen attacks, she sank Tateyama Maru and two 35-ton sampans.

She departed Pearl Harbor on 18 March 1943 and, after topping off with fuel and provisions at Midway Island on 22 March, headed for the eastern coast of northern Honshū, Japan and was never heard from again. Pickerel was the first submarine to be lost in the Central Pacific area. She was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 19 August 1943.

Post-war analysis of Japanese records give conflicting suggestions about Pickerel ' s fate. The Japanese officially credit her with sinking Submarine Chaser Number 13 on 3 April and Fukuei Maru on 7 April, and give no official report of her destruction. Those records also describe an action off Shiramuka Lighthouse on northern Honshū on 3 April 1943 in which naval aircraft first bombed an unidentified submarine, then directed Shiragami and Bunzan Maru to the spot, where they dropped twenty-six depth charges. A large quantity of oil floated to the surface, which was often enough for Japanese ASW ships to believe their target was sunk. It is likely Pickerel ' s fuel oil bunkers leaked. Since there were several other ASW operations in the area in that period, ⎘] and Pickerel was the only American submarine in that area one of these other attacks, sometime after 7 April, probably claimed her.


WW2 Fallen 100

Theodore was born January 18, 1919 in Naper, Nebraska. His father Christian was born in Russia, his mother Johanna was born in Nebraska to Russian immigrants. He had four older sisters, three older brothers, three younger brothers, and two younger sisters. At some point prior to the 1920 census, the family relocated to Bowdle, South Dakota, where his father worked as a farmer. In 1940, Theodore was living at home with his parents and younger siblings.

Theodore enlisted in the US Navy in February 1941, and following basic training, was assigned to submarine school. After completion of sub school, he went to sea aboard the USS Pickerel (SS-177) as a Torpedoman’s Mate Third Class. Pickerel initially was based at San Diego, but after Pearl Harbor was relocated to Manila Bay in the Philippines. Between December 1941 and February 1943, Pickerel completed six war patrols in the Pacific theater and sank five enemy ships totaling 16,100 tons, and damaged another ten, totaling 9,100 tons. On March 22, 1943 Pickerel departed Midway Island on her seventh war patrol, headed for the eastern coast of northern Japan, and was never heard from again. The Pickerel was reported lost at sea on May 12, 1943, with all hands officially declared dead on August 10, 1945.

After the war, captured Japanese documents provided insight to the Pickerel’s likely fate. The documents noted that a submarine was attacked and damaged by depth charges launched from aircraft and ships off Shiramuka Lighthouse in northern Honshu on April 3, 1943. Although damaged, the sub managed to carry on with her combat operations, sinking a 440-ton submarine chaser on April 3 and a 1,113-ton cargo ship on April 7. The submarine described in the Japanese reports was most likely the Pickerel, since she was the only Allied submarine operating in that area at the time. She was likely sunk shortly after April 7.

Theodore Gustave Feiock is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii. There is also a memorial stone for him at Black Hills National Cemetery near Sturgis, South Dakota.

Thank you Theodore for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Theodore.
_____
This profile was written by Bob Fuerst. "I’m a NASA engineer, B-17 Flying Fortress enthusiast, and amateur genealogist so this kind of research is an ideal outlet for me. But more than anything, it’s a way to express my sincere appreciation for The Greatest Generation and the sacrifices that they made, especially those who made the ultimate sacrifice. They should never be forgotten and I’m grateful to Don for allowing me to play a small part in honoring them."

Last year on this date I profiled Wesley Bales of the USS Pensacola. You can read about Wesley here.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100

Please consider joining the public Facebook group to increase the exposure of this project. Go to: WW2 Fallen 100


Difference Between Walleye and Pickerel

Walleye vs Pickerel

A walleye is sometimes called a pickerel, particularly in English-speaking parts of Canada, but in fact, the walleye and the pickerel are not at all related. However, both are members of the same family, the pike family or Esocidae.

Walleyes are freshwater perciform fishes. Their scientific name is ‘Sander vitreus’, but also formerly as ‘Stizostedion vitreum’. These fishes are native to Canada, and also to the northern United States. There are two kinds of walleye, and the most common is the ‘yellow walleye’ (sander vitreus vitreus). They are called this name to distinguish them from the endangered ‘blue walleye’ (Sander vitreus glaucus). Blue walleyes are now extinct in the Great Lakes, and are bordering on complete extinction everywhere else in the world.

Walleyes are named in this way because their eyes reflect light, just like those of cats. The fish are able to see well in low-light conditions, and even in turbid waters, because of the light-gathering attributes of its eyes. The walleye’s vision allows the fish to populate the deeper regions of the water. They are often found in deeper water, especially when the climate is warm.

The color of walleye is primarily olive and gold. The common name of the fish in French is ‘doré’, which means golden. Walleyes can reach lengths of about 75 cm, or 30 inches, and can weigh up to 7 kg or 15 lbs.

Walleyes are very popular with anglers, therefore catching them is regulated by natural resource agencies. They are easier to catch when its dark, around dusk and dawn, because they extensively feed during those times. When the water is turbid, preventing light from penetrating, walleyes also thrive in catching prey. Anglers take advantage of this to hook them. Many consider walleyes to have the best taste among freshwater fishes, and that is why they are so popular.

Now, let’s talk about pickerels:

Their exact name is Chain Pickerels (Esox niger), and they are also freshwater fishes. Sometimes they are called federation pikes or federation pickerels. They are also found in Canada, North America, and in other regions as well. Although the common name ‘pickerel’ is loosely given to walleyes, the true pickerel is the chain pickerel. In southern US, they are nicknamed as ‘jack fish’.

Chain pickerels are rather greenish, particularly the color of their sides. They are about 30 inches in length, but sometimes may reach over 40 inches (although this is rare), and they can weigh up to 10 lbs. On average, their size is about 24 inches and 3 lbs. Reportedly however, pickerels of 1-2 lbs are most commonly caught.

They catch prey via ambush. They lunge explosively at their prey, and secure the food with their sharp teeth. They may sometimes leap out of the water to catch low-flying insects and dangling lures of anglers. Many think of them as ‘trash fishes’ and not really good for eating, but edible nonetheless.

1. Walleyes have great vision under low-light conditions and turbid waters they use this advantage to catch prey. Pickerels do not have this eyesight ability, but catche their prey with quick lunges and ferocity.

2. (Yellow)Walleyes are olive and golden in color, while pickerels are greenish.

3. Walleyes are slightly larger and heavier than pickerels.

4. Walleyes significantly taste better than pickerels.

5. Walleyes are found in deeper waters, while pickerels thrive in shallower waters.


Conclusion:

Overall this was a great trip for anyone looking for a relaxing paddle with no portages and spectacular views. For being right off the main channel, this small tributary off the Pickerel River aloud for a peaceful getaway disconnected from the cottages and boaters.

Depending on wind direction certain sections can become wind tunnels and either cause for tough headwinds, or easy tailwinds. This route also has many alternative options due to the complexity of passageways scraped into existence by the glaciers. Having a trusty map and GPS, one could spend a long time exploring the nooks and crannies of this beautiful Provincial Park.


Watch the video: USS Pickerel SS-177 (December 2022).

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